When Did Fashion Become Porn? Good Question, i-D

i-D is chiming in on the Terry Richardson debate, albeit without naming him explicitly.

In a think piece on the magazine’s slick new website, fashion savant and ex-i-D editor Caryn Franklin weighs in on the prevalence of pornography in fashion –- a topic you’re probably sick of hearing about, but one that’s more relevant than ever now that over 15,000 industry insiders and outsiders have added their voices to the conversation.

Franklin’s lead question, ‘When did fashion become porn?’ morphs into a takedown of the fashion and entertainment industry mass culture. She blames them for conditioning the minds of young boys via repeat exposure to record levels of internet porn:

“Repeat exposure to that kind of TV can mess up male brains, as tests conducted within a recent Channel 4 documentary on a young porn-addict confirmed. For one thing, being forced to seek frequent lonely masturbatory relief in public toilets several times a day is just grim. Mutual sexual pleasure in real time is unlikely too. Plain old Vanilla Sex doesn’t hit the spot any more.”

And demonstrates excellent use of lurid mind pictures:

“Pornification of our popular culture is happening right under our noses. Second-rate studio shots of shaved labias pinned open by ragged hands, are being joined by immaculately styled, big budget, fashion and music imagery.”

Then come the requisite Miley Cyrus shout outs, with Franklin using the pop star as a case study for the argument that young women who are told it’s a good idea to perform cunnilingus on DIY power tools deserve patience. You get the idea, though, that the ‘pornographers’ (or GWCs) who put such ideas out there, though, don’t deserve the same tolerance.

And fashion, like music, is the perfect misogyny catalyst, thanks to its reduction of women to good old T&A. So we’re assuming that high contrast bukkake falls into Franklin’s definition of ‘lack of creativity’ rather than ‘artiste’:

Have creative thinkers fallen prey to moral atrophy, now that their brains are prematurely addled by too much Internet fanny? Are we bereft of new and innovative ideas, so porn will do? Is the hollow draw of women as sexual caricatures – reduced to breasts, genitals and pouty manoeuvres, sheathed in designer chiffon, or accompanied by hi-production sound values, an artistic statement?

With her time now spread between fashion activism, diversity campaigning, helming All Walks Beyond the Catwalk (which recently shared this), co-chairing Fashion Targets Breast Cancer and penning the occasional rant, Franklin no longer has time to decide who shoots i-D’s covers. And considering that the magazine is owned by the Richardson groupies at Vice Media, we’re pretty certain it can stay on this list for the time being.

Read Franklin’s article here.

Related links:
Vogue, H&M, Mango: Who’s Still Working With Terry Richardson?
Should Terry Richardson Be Guilty Until Proven Innocent?
Miley Cyrus and Terry Richardson Enjoy Blunts, Wedgies

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