Kate Moss: ‘I Had A Nervous Breakdown When I Was 17′

Kate Moss covers the December issue of Vanity Fair, and inside, she candidly reveals that her rise to the top wasn’t always glamourous. In fact, for her it was the exact opposite, and she opens up about having a nervous breakdown when she was just 17-years-old and feeling uncomfortable posing nude.

Most people are familiar with Moss’ iconic Calvin Klein underwear ad with Mark Wahlberg in the early ’90s — she’s topless and straddling his legs, and both are dressed in the brand’s jeans and undergarments. But as great as that photo is, Moss tells the mag that it resulted in some serious trauma:

“I had a nervous breakdown when I was 17 or 18, when I had to go and work with Marky Mark. It didn’t feel like me at all. I felt really bad about straddling this buff guy. I didn’t like it. I couldn’t get out of bed for two weeks. I thought I was going to die. I went to the doctor, and he said, ‘I’ll give you some Valium,’ and Francesca Sorrenti, thank God, said, ‘You’re not taking that.’ It was just anxiety. Nobody takes care of you mentally. There’s a massive pressure to do what you have to do. I was really little, and I was going to work with Steven Meisel. It was just really weird—a stretch limo coming to pick you up from work. I didn’t like it. But it was work, and I had to do it.”

Moss also opens up about her cover of The Face and posing nude for Corinne Day:

“I see a 16-year-old now, and to ask her to take her clothes off would feel really weird. But they were like, If you don’t do it, then we’re not going to book you again. So I’d lock myself in the toilet and cry and then come out and do it. I never felt very comfortable about it. There’s a lot of boobs. I hated my boobs! Because I was flat-chested. And I had a big mole on one. That picture of me running down the beach—I’ll never forget doing that, because I made the hairdresser, who was the only man on the shoot, turn his back.”

It’s refreshing and surprising to hear Kate talk so openly about her first modeling days, especially since she’s still in such high demand. Of course, it also makes us wonder how far the industry has come since then — which, apparently, is not far at all.

Check out Moss’ full cover below:





[Vanity Fair]

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