Hearst Heir Wants To Stop Cosmo From Being Sold To Minors

Victoria Hearst, granddaughter of Hearst Corporation founder William Randolph Hearst, has recently joined a crusade against Hearst Magazines‘ own Cosmopolitan. Until now, Victoria has lead a quiet life away from the public eye as a born again Christian, but now she’s speaking out against “the disgusting stuff” that Cosmo puts on the stands by teaming up with model Nicole Weider to get it censored.

The New York Observer reports that Weider, also a born again Christian, created this Change.org petition because she ”felt like the Lord was telling [her she] needed to talk to the company.” In it she urges people to sign in support of getting Cosmo put on the stands in “non-transparent wrappers” and making it illegal to sell the rag to minors. She also states that she has already sent letters of protest to Cosmopolitan editor-in-chief Kate White and “the Senator of California” (because, you know, there’s only one).

Victoria originally tried to fight the obscenity that is Cosmo from within her family, but to no avail. The magazine happens to be a bestseller worldwide with editions in 32 different languages. She then called Hearst CEO Frank Bennack, which also didn’t go so well. Bennack said the phone call turned into a “heated discussion” in which he told Victoria that she was making the issue “like it’s black and white”, to which Victoria responded, “No, Frank, it’s green”. Whatever that means.

Victoria and Weider plan to hold a demonstration outside the magazine’s New York offices this summer. Their preferred method of protest? Weider told Observer that they’re going “to embarrass them by putting dirty sex tips from the magazine on our signs”. This will no doubt be effective as Cosmo will be suddenly humiliated by the content that it publishes in 63 different countries once it’s put on a picket sign.

Cosmo is certainly known for being risqué at best and downright raunchy at worst, and the idea of children seeing its headlines at the grocery store is kind of icky. But they do have the right to publish what they want — and until we can censor the entire internet, those kids have access to far more graphic content.

[New York Observer]

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