America’s Wealthiest Shop At Macy’s?

When we dream of being rich, it usually involves black Amex cards with limitless credit, sprees at Bergdorf’s and Barney’s, and all the one-of-a-kind vintage money can buy. Which is why it was extra surprising to see that rich Americans prefer to shop at Macy’s.

According to an infographic compiled by The Business of Fashion, consumers with an annual income of $100,000 or more spend more time shopping at Macys.com than they do at Neimans, Barney’s, ShopBop, Bloomies, and Saks combined. The top five online shopping destinations include Nordstrom’s, Zappos, JC Penney, and Kohl’s.

Leonora Epstein over at The Frisky expresses some disbelief that Barneys.com is at the bottom of the list. As a New York-centric store with only 14 outposts nation-wide, this actually seems appropriate. And the more we look at BoF’s infographic, the more we think its results are less dramatic and more, well, appropriate.

First, it’s worth mentioning — as BoF does — that the data used to compile these results is at best an estimate. But more importantly, an annual income of $100,000 a year doesn’t get you particularly far in America’s most urban cities like New York, Los Angeles, Boston, San Francisco, or Chicago. It does, however, go a long way if you’re in a mid-sized city like Omaha or Jacksonville, where a Neiman Marcus, Saks, or Barney’s outpost is unlikely — but Kohl’s, Macy’s, and JC Penney are all mall real estate staples. People shop with brands they know. Also: let’s be honest, Bergdorf’s sells $10,000 dresses. No one in their right mind is going to spend 10% of their income on one dress.

Right?

One final thought: it’s interesting to see how much of the market flash sale sites have carved out — Gilt, GiltMan, GiltFuse, Rue La La, and HauteLook all ranked relatively well. But who doesn’t love a bargain?

Anyway, full infographic below. What do you think? Does it line up with your shopping tendencies?


via Signature 9.

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