Your Drunk Shopping Habit Just Got A Little More Dangerous

Who out there hasn’t come home from a boozy dinner or post-work drinks and said, “Credit card bills be damned, that vintage taxidermied zebra head shall be mine!” (True story.) But truly, substitute vintage zebra taxidermy for “necklace” or “bag” or “black J.Brand skinny jeans” and you’d be hard-pressed to find an imbiber who hasn’t drunkenly hit buy. And now online retailers have picked up on this totally obvious phenomenon and are starting to target our tipsy tendencies.

According to The New York Times, merchants are putting a concerted effort into marketing to our sotted surfing. Take Gilt Groupe, for example.

“Post-bar, inhibitions can be impacted, and that can cause shopping, and hopefully healthy impulse buying,” said Andy Page, the president of Gilt Groupe, an online retailer that is adding more sales starting at 9 p.m. to respond to high traffic then — perhaps some of it by shoppers under the influence.

Similarly, eBay’s busiest time of day is from 6:30 to 10:30 in each time zone. Writes the Times:

Asked if drinking might be a factor, Steve Yankovich, vice president for mobile for eBay, said, “Absolutely.” He added: “I mean, if you think about what most people do when they get home from work in the evening, it’s decompression time. The consumer’s in a good mood.”

This is true! We are very good drunk eBayers. But while we love the surprise satisfaction that comes with the arrival of a forgotten purchase, one New Yorker offers a decidedly more rewarding reason for buying while boozing.

Amanda Schuster, a wine-and-spirits writer and consultant in Brooklyn, says she never shops in actual stores after drinking, but she finds it hard to resist the Web. “It feels productive in a way — like I didn’t just come home drunk and pass out, I went home and did something,” she said.

And who doesn’t love feeling productive? Also, when you drunk shop from home, no one ever has to see you like this:

[NYT]

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